Tikal - Guatemala

Notes^ Miller and Taube (1993), p.20.^ See annotations of the equivalent images of this mask, Nos. 7909A, 7909B, 7909C, at the Justin Kerr Precolumbian Portfolio (Kerr n.d.)

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Discussion on Tikal

?....... :

I need help on getting all the information on all tikal temples

Fozzie :
"check the Guatemala website. The ruins at Tikal are huge (65 meters) and awe inspiring. I beleive they are the largest Mayan ruins in Central America! I have seen them and hiked around them and they are incredible. much grander than Copan in Honduras."
Sweetie :
"Tikal (or Tik’al, according to the more current orthography) is the largest of the ancient ruined cities of the Maya civilization. It is located in the El Petén department of Guatemala at 17°13′19″N, 89°37′22″W. Now part of Guatemala's Tikal National Park, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a popular tourist spot. The closest large towns are Flores and Santa Elena, about 30 kilometers away. Tikal was one of the major cultural and population centers of the Maya civilization. Though monumental architecture at the site dates to the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 AD to 850 AD, during which time the site dominated the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica, such as central Mexican center of Teotihuacan. There is also evidence that Tikal was even conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century A.D. Following the end of the Late Classic, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the site’s abandonment by the end of the 10th century. Tikal was one of the major cultural and population centers of the Maya civilization. Though monumental architecture at the site dates to the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 AD to 850 AD, during which time the site dominated the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica, such as central Mexican center of Teotihuacan. There is also evidence that Tikal was even conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century A.D. Following the end of the Late Classic, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the site’s abandonment by the end of the 10th century. Tikal was one of the major cultural and population centers of the Maya civilization. Though monumental architecture at the site dates to the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 AD to 850 AD, during which time the site dominated the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica, such as central Mexican center of Teotihuacan. There is also evidence that Tikal was even conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century A.D. Following the end of the Late Classic, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the site’s abandonment by the end of the 10th century. Tikal was one of the major cultural and population centers of the Maya civilization. Though monumental architecture at the site dates to the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 AD to 850 AD, during which time the site dominated the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica, such as central Mexican center of Teotihuacan. There is also evidence that Tikal was even conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century A.D. Following the end of the Late Classic, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the site’s abandonment by the end of the 10th century. Environmental setting The ruins lie on lowland rainforest. Conspicuous trees at the Tikal park include gigantic ceiba (Ceiba pentandra) the sacred tree of the Maya; tropical cedar (Cedrela odorata), and mahogany (Swietenia). Regarding the fauna, agouti, coatis, gray fox, spider monkeys, howler monkeys, Harpy Eagles, Falcons, ocellated turkeys, guans, toucans, green parrots and leaf-cutting ants can be seen there regularly. Jaguars Jaguarundis and Cougars are also said to roam in the park. The name "Tikal" is probably not ancient. It most likely derives from Ti-akal, a Mayan place name meaning "At the Reservoir(s)."[citation needed] This refers to the several large and partially artificial water basins found near the center of the ruins. Hieroglyphic inscriptions at the ruins, however, refer to the central area of the ancient city as Yax Mutal or Yax Mutul. The kingdom as a whole was simply called Mutal or Mutul, which is the reading of the "hair bundle" Emblem Glyph seen in the accompanying photo. Its meaning remains obscure, altough some scholars think is the Hair knot of the Ahau or ruler. There are thousands of ancient structures at Tikal and only a fraction of these have been excavated after decades of archaeological work. The most prominent surviving buildings include six very large Mesoamerican step pyramids, labeled Temples I - VI, each of which support a temple structure on their summits. Some of these pyramids are over 60 meters high (200 feet). They were numbered sequentially during the early survey of the site. The majority of pyramids currently visible at Tikal were built during Tikal’s resurgence following the Tikal Hiatus (i.e., from the late 7th to the early 9th century). It should be noted, however, that the majority of these structures contain sub-structures that were initially built prior to the hiatus. Temple I (also known as the Temple of Ah Cacao or Temple of the Great Jaguar) was built around A.D. 695; Temple II or the Moon Temple in A.D. 702; and Temple III in A.D. 810. The largest structure at Tikal, Temple IV, is approximately 70 meters (230 feet) tall. Temple IV marks the reign of Yik’in Chan Kawil (Ruler B, the son of Ruler A or Jasaw Chan K'awiil I) and two carved wooden lintels over the doorway that leads into the temple on the pyramid’s summit record a long count date (9.15.10.0.0) that corresponds to A.D. 741 (Sharer 1994:169). Temple V dates to about A.D. 750, and is the only one where no tomb has been found. Temple VI, also known as the Temple of the Inscriptions, was dedicated in A.D. 766. Str. 5C-54, in the southwest portion of Tikal’s central core and west of Temple V, is known as the Lost World Pyramid. A 30 mt. High "True Pyramid", with stairways in 3 sides and stucco masks, dating to the Late Preclassic, this pyramid is part of an enclosed complex of structures that remained intact through and un-impacted by later building activity at Tikal. The organization of this complex adheres to the themes defined for E-Groups. The ancient city also has the remains of royal palaces, in addition to a number of smaller pyramids, palaces, residences, and inscribed stone monuments. There is even a building which seemed to have been a jail, originally with wooden bars across the windows and doors. There are also seven courts for playing the Mesoamerican ballgame, including a set of 3 in the "Seven Temples Plaza" a unique feature in Mesoamerica. The residential area of Tikal covers an estimated 60 km² (23 square miles), much of which has not yet been cleared, mapped, or excavated. A huge set of earthworks has been discovered ringing Tikal with a 6 meter wide trench behind a rampart. Only some 9km of it has been mapped; it may have enclosed an area of some 125 km square (see below). Population estimates place the demographic size of the site between 100,000 and 200,000. Recently, a project exploring the earthworks has shown that the scale of the earthworks is highly variable and that in many places it is inconsequential as a defensive feature. In addition, some parts of the earthwork were integrated into a canal system. The earthwork of Tikal varies significantly in coverage from what was originally proposed and it is much more complex and multifaceted than originally thought"
davidwrightpat :

Memories of Tikal. It is hard to explain to others your private feelings of being in such a place, I had been all over the wholeTikal for most of the day, looking at the main centre and climbing up to the top of all the temples, trying to put myself in this very position so long ago, it was pure history, as eventualy time got the better of me and I walked around looking to leave the area, then I found the tallest temple, I thought it was temple 5 (but I have been corrected since), it was temple 4, to get to the top you have to climb up a vertical slope, climb up a tree ladder then clamber up a thin vertical ladder about 20 metres to the top. The thin platform must have been less than 1 1/2 metre wide. That is where I spent the next 14 hours, enjoying life as pure as it could be, with views which would blow your mind, alone but for the local bird life and sleeping under the stars. The morning view, it still gives me a feeling of butterflies in my stomach, when I think of it. Do it

shellac10 :
"No I haven't but now I want to after I read your explaination sounds like it was lots and lots of fun"
neltuco :
"es simple, no hace falta que lo pongas en evidencia ante tanta gente"
politicallyinept :
"Yes, Tikal is a magical place. I have yet to see an archeological site in Mesoamerica that has had the same effect on me as Tikal. My next goal is to go up and down the Usumacinta and view some of the smaller sites there. Copan and Palenque are nice too, but they don't compare to Tikal."
davidwrightpat :

Guatemala, Tikal Tempel 5

phoenix2frequent :
"I don't remember climbing temple 5: I did, however, climb the tallest temple at Tikal, Temple 4, in the pre-dawn dark so I could watch the sun rise. It was amazing. A forest full of sound, but still dark... and when light dawned, I could see nothing but forest to the horizon all round, with only the tops of the other Tikal temples jutting through. One of the world's most amazing places, isn't it?"
monkeymanelvis :
"No. I would love to though. I bet that would be great. The stars there are meant to be breath taking."
guido1900us :
"I was in Tikal in 1969. We stayed in Temple 1 and Temple 2. The guards charged 1 quetzal per night per person. In 1969 a quetzal was worth 1 dollar. Now you can about 7.5 quetzals for 1 dollar."
jorgeyankee :
"Just at the sunset. Is amazing, i´m from Guatemala and only been in Tikal once in my life.... but in the Us... twice a year since 1997."

 

Comments on Tikal

champ_rock
Date: 2008-02-05 21:31:18

From "Portals into the Past" (e.g., Pompeii, Tikal) to "Scaling New Heights" (Mt Kilimanjaro, Yangtze River) to "Triumphs of Vision" (Zen Garden of Kyoto). Check out the photo gallery--pics repping each destination.


-Maverick-
Date: 2008-02-05 21:31:18

Embark upon a fantastic journey to the secretive empire of the Mayas. Go back in time 2,000 years and discover the mysterious temples and fabulous treasures of this once so powerful culture! Play the adventure mode and try to solve the mystical puzzle surrounding the ancient temple of Tikal or simply select your favorite Mahjongg boards.


marsian
Date: 2008-02-05 21:31:18

Play the adventure mode and try to solve the mystical puzzle surrounding the ancient temple of Tikal or simply select your favorite Mahjongg boards on over 300 layouts. Experience classical Mahjongg in an unprecedented atmosphere of detailed graphics and fantastic animations!


chuckadog
Date: 2008-02-05 21:31:18

In this Guatemalan city, there are ruins on a grander scale than better-known Chichén Itzá.




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Tikal
Encyclopedic entry for the largest of the ancient ruined cities of the Maya civilization.
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